Writing an Anagram poem: Hirsute

H I R S U T E

You would need a shirt
to cover up at the beach. A true
layer of warmth sadly does not suit
any season. The daily rite
of razing what is sire-
d not of your own volition is sure
to rub anyone the wrong way. Tire-
some products, apparatuses for a suite
bathroom – are sophisticated but hurt-
ful to a natural hobbit from the Shire.

Explanation:

I am trying something new. Sometimes prompts and normal styles feel mundane and I need a fresh challenge to push my creativity. Enter, Terrance Hayes. He invents new formal constraints to write interestingly about very human subjects. I haven’t read his works (yet); just the one poem: Nuclear, which is a perfect example for an ‘Anagram poem‘.

These poems are adopted from the word games that we find in newspapers. The rules are:

  1. End words must be derived from four or more letters in the title.
  2. Words which acquire four letters by the addition of “s” are not used.
  3. Only one form of a verb is used.

Crafting this poem was a very enjoyable experience. I found it stimulating to have to speak about the subject with the words that are derived from the subject – there is something very Cubist about this affair.

I haven’t made any surprising inventions here (and hope to get better with practice) but I was surprised by how my thoughts could weave around designated words and still not lose their intentions. Is this what it means to be led by the horse and the road?

Update: Judy from lifelessons blog chose this as her prompt for the day (thank you so much!) and has brewed a brilliant Anagram Poem of her own, with a twist. Make sure you read it here.

Nananoyz from Praying for Eyebrowz has also attempted an Anagram poem and made the challenge even trickier. A brilliant composition. Have a look here.

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16 thoughts on “Writing an Anagram poem: Hirsute”

  1. What fun. I’m going to try one as well. And, I challenge you to write a poem consisting of six stanzas, the first with 6 lines and each thereafter one less line. Each line in each stanza rhymes with all the other lines in that stanza and each stanza’s rhyme is a near rhyme to the last. The name of this form is Sylvestrian Near Rhyme. I used this form recently in the poem “Near” in my blog. I’d love it if you would attempt the form and send me the results as comments or a link to my blog.==Judy

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Judy! I look forward to reading your Anagram poem.
      I read ‘Near’! WOW! The form is complex, challenging and exciting. I really like the effect it has. I am just beginning to learn about formal poetry and just about started to get used to being more deliberate with metaphors, meters and now rhyme. I will definitely try writing in the Sylvestrian Near Rhyme soon. Something for the coming week? For now I have traditional sonnet to write and submit for the poetry class.
      Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts. It’s always nice to hear from you.

      Like

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